UK 2019 Day 11: Birding Day at Slimbridge Wetland Centre

Posted August 19, 2019

May 19, 2019

Since my planned birding day near Plymouth didn’t work out, I took Darren’s advice and checked out the Slimbridge Wetland Centre (also referred to as “Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust”) in Gloucestershire [map]. There’s a lot going at this remarkable place, but for birders (particularly out-of-country ones!) it was a bit confusing. The first part, near the visitor center, is a series of exhibits showcasing birds from around the world, including local birds! And although these birds are ostensibly “clipped” to keep them from flying free, I observed on a few occasions these birds making short flights that could carry them out of their “enclosure” habitats. I’ll post my eBird link after the photos (presented without commentary beyond captions), but take some of the duck and geese species with a grain of salt. I tried to weed out the “captive” species, but there may be a few of the ambiguous sightings that got left in.

Black and white duck with a dark purple head.
Tufted Ducks were not rare during our entire visit, but photo opportunities of this species were. This one was at the visitors’ centre, but should be representative of the many I did see out in the wild.
Small white gull with a dark brown head.
Black-headed Gulls are possibly the only – um – black headed gulls without black heads. It is actually a dark chocolate brown. I’ve seen this species as a vagrant in the USA, but this is a native, free-flying bird.
Mostly white duck (with some black on face and back).
The Smews at the visitors’ centre seemed captive, but a few of the birds flew to adjacent pools, so I listed these, but perhaps I shouldn’t have. I’ve not heard anything from the eBird reviewer on the matter. This one is a drake.
Grey duck with a white throat and russet head.
Female Smews are much different looking than the drakes (males).
White duck with a black back and greenish head, a brown headed duck behind it.
Common Goldeneyes are also seen in the USA, this pair were at the visitors’ centre, but I saw some flying out in the marshes later in the morning.
Mostly white duck (with black face and back) standing just behind a gray duck with white throat and russet head.
A Smew couple on land.
Large black bird with a gray face and bill.
Rooks are common enough around the UK, and the ones throughout the park were quite photogenic and accommodating.
A orange-red duck with a white head and black bill and tail.
Like some of the other duck species, Ruddy Shelducks were at the visitors’ centre pools (like this) and out in the wetlands, too.
Brown bird with cream belly perched on reeds.
Waterfowl dominated the visitors’ centre, but once out in the park and on the trails, there were more songbirds, like this Reed Warbler.
Small brown bird sining, perched atop twigs in a dead tree.
The tiny Eurasian Wrens made up for their size with loud, ringing voices. The song is reminiscent of Song Sparrows in North America. This caused me a deal of confusion throughout the trip.
Brown, black and white shorebird with 2 head streamers, walking on a mudflat.
Photos out over the marsh and meadows from some of the blinds were tough. This shot of a Northern Lapwing and many of the upcoming shots are heavily cropped.
Black and white wading bird with an up-swept bill.
One of about a dozen or so Pied Avocets feeding in the shallow water.
White wading bird with a spoon-shaped bill in front of tall marsh vegetation.
While not listed as particularly rare, this Eurasian Spoonbill seemed to be causing quite a stir among the other birders at the blind.
Small gray bird with a red-orange face and breast.
In the wooded area near one blind, I saw this one-legged European Robin. It seemed to be managing fine, but I wonder what happened.
Small turquoise bird with orange breast and belly and long bill.
At the next blind, it took some patience to wait for one of the Common Kingfishers to arrive back at its mud bank cavity nest site.
Large black bird with gray face and bill.
Another handsome Rook. This one was near some picnic tables, looking for an easy snack from the park patrons.
Close of of a black bird with gray face and bill.
A close-up of a Rook. It’s thought that the partially naked face is due to Rooks being opportunistic omnivores, not ones to pass up carrion. Like vultures, this avoids facial feathers being fouled by blood and such.
Black and white goose sitting among daisies.
Back at the visitors’ centre, this Barnacle Goose flew in and landed on the lawn to rest.
An adult swan keeps one eye on a nearby coot while watching its little gray cygnet swim along.
Many of the birds at the park (including the visitors’ centre) are breeding and had chicks, like this Mute Swan and its cygnet. This is one reason it is difficult to completely exclude the exhibit birds from lists. They are obviously breeding and some are flying about.

I’ve left off photos of some of the more exotic birds – like the Nene, a South American bird called a screamer (for good reason!), and some others that are clearly not UK or European birds. I may post them as bonus or extras in the future.

Here’s the somewhat confusing eBird list for the day. Ruth and Mrs. Lonely Birder came to pick me up after shopping in nearby Gloucester.

https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56496450

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