UK Day 10: Marazion and the Cornish Coast

Posted August 16, 2019

[Note: I realize it’s taking me some time to get through these posts. Please bear with me. It’s been a hectic summer]

May 18, 2019

Continuing our travels along the south coast of England, we drove back through Cornwall and to the ancient village of Marazion [map]. Off shore on the island of Saint Michael’s Mount is a castle and church that can be visited by foot during low tide. When the tide comes in, the causeway is submerged and the mount is only accessible by boat or amphibious vehicle.

Castle atop a wooded island off the coast, a beach in the foreground.
A view of Saint Michael’s Mount, looking at the harbor side.

The beach itself is quite flat, and when the tide is out one can wade quite far in places. A beach like this would be stacked with people, blankets, chairs, and fishing poles back home in Florida. Here, the beach was mainly empty, with people enjoying sea views from benches, restaurants, and shops from the village.

Rocks beyond a sandy beach at low tide.
You can see how wide the beach is, and the waters beyond were quite shallow.

The castle and chapel are impressive, even at a distance and I imagine the views commanded from this vantage-point are impressive. People do live and work on the island, and an order of monks is active at the chapel.

Close-up of a castle and chapel.
Part of the castle and the chapel atop Saint Michael’s Mount.

The main part of the island was gated and closed, which seems a shame as there are extensive gardens and a museum I would have liked to see. I hear the geology is unique and impressive as well. But it was a lovely diversion nonetheless, but we couldn’t stay long as the tide was about to come in, which threatened to strand us on the island (or at least have to hire a boat) as the causeway would be inundated.

Stone archway with a metal gate at the end of a low stone wall.
Access denied. Sorry to have to go, Saint Michael’s Mount…

Meanwhile, back on the beach…

Small metal sign bolted to a rock wall that says, "DO NOT FEED THE SEAGULLS THEY ARE DANGEROUS AND A HEALTH HAZARD"
Forewarned is forearmed?
Herring Gull standing on a rock.
Aw, this Herring Gull looks harmless!

We walked back to the beach and then into Marazion, and had lunch at a cafe that had some local fare, known as a pasty. Pasties are a pastry filled with meat and root vegetables. Traditionally, they were miners’ food. The thick crust around the edge serving as a handhold that wasn’t normally eaten since the miners’ hands might be contaminated by arsenic or other poisonous substances related to mining.

A pasty on a plate, waiting to be devoured!
Lovely pasty! (Thanks, Ruth, for the photo!)

From Marazion we worked our way west along the coast until we reached the ruins of the Botallack Mine, not far from the town of St. Just [map].

Three windmills in a filed beyond the hedgerows.
Windmills are perhaps the most visible sign of how the UK has moved away from coal generated power. While we were there, the country had just had of a couple of weeks were no coal at all was used!

This stretch of coast has to be one of the most dramatic and impressive sights we saw in our whole trip. The juxtaposition of the natural beauty of the rocky coast and dramatic cliffs with the many abandoned mining structures makes for a nearly unparalleled visual experience. Add in the roar of the waves on the rocks below and the wildflowers blooming, and you can imagine what an experience this was.

Stone ruins among rocky pastures.
The remains of the mining engine houses from the Botallack Mine.

As we approached the cliffs, a low fog was dispersing along the coast, which made the scene even more fantastical.

Rocky outcrop and cliffs over a misty ocean.
In ways, this landscape seemed a convergence of the sea cliffs we saw in Wales, the flowers and grass of Dartmoor, and the ruins of Minions. Very England.

Seabirds were circling below (Northern Fulmars, as it happens) as waves and foam churned on the rocks. We were only able to walk so far down along the cliffs due to trail closures for safety.

Stone ruins on a cliff, next to the ocean.
From these structures, miners actually tunneled under the seabed up to 1/2 a mile (800 meters) to get the valuable copper ore, even breaching the ocean, flooding the mines.
Churning waves and foam on rocks below, looking down an sea cliff.
It would be hard to find any safe harbor approaching this part of the north coast of Cornwall.

The scope and scale of the cliffs are hard to grasp from photos alone. They are hundreds of feet high, some with very narrow places to walk out on. The lingering fog helped confuse the distance cues a bit, but added to the drama.

Rough rocky coastline with mining ruins in the background.
Most of what we saw in the UK was spectacular and I’d trade none of it, but Cornwall definitely stole a bit of my heart.

We were very near both Penzance and Land’s End, but we stopped at neither. On a future visit I would like to spend more time in this part of England and take it all in, natural and human.

Rocky peninsula backdrop with cliff top in the foreground..
Darren says this is looking toward Sennan Cove, and Land’s End (beyond).

We spent some time marveling at the scenery before climbing back out, past the mining houses and the furnace ruins, looking up at smokestacks that seem to defy gravity and the elements.

More stone ruins and a tall stone smokestack on a cliff top, with two people (looking quite small) standing nearby.
Here’s more sense of scale: The two small vertical objects on the left are people standing on the cliff edge.

As we made our way back toward Bristol, we crossed into Plymouth by way of the Torpoint Ferry, rather than the bridge. It was fun.

A car ferry crossing the river.
Two boats run, one in each direction, and both were full. Photo thanks to Mrs. Lonely Birder.

Mrs. Lonely Birder and I got out of the car and went up on the deck and enjoyed some fresh air and a look at a few Royal Navy Ships. The ferries run on cables between both sides which is a safer, if more boring option for ferries ;-).

2 naval ships across the harbor.
Some Navy ships in the harbour. Photo thanks to Mrs. Lonely Birder.

We eventually got back to Bristol and walked to the local pub (The Knowle) so those that imbibe could have a pint and we unwound a bit. On the way there, we passed some trees that have been decorated like fairy homes!

small fairly door and window on the base of an urban tree by the sidewalk.
We didn’t knock to see if anyone was home. Photo thanks to Mrs. Lonely Birder.
Urban tree decorated with eyes, nose, and mouth.
This tree ended up looking a bit Entish, if you ask me. Photo thanks to Mrs. Lonely Birder.

We ended the day out at the pub, in which Mrs. Lonely Birder saw a familiar friend, reminding us of our previous epic trip to Churchill, Manitoba! I’ll leave you with a couple of parting shots.

Pub building, red brick and white trim. Sign says "The Knowle".
The local pub. We didn’t stay long, but it was sort of a checklist item of ours. Cheers, mate!
A drawing of bears framed on a wall, person pointing to Polar Bear with one hand, holding a pint of ale in the other.
It was pure cool to have a Polar Bear drawing by our table, linking our life-time trips together!

 

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