UK 2019 Day 12: Part 2, The Bishop’s Palace and a Little Bite of Cheddar

Posted November 14, 2019

And we’re back!

We had a good look at Wells Cathedral in Part 1, so let’s continue on to The Bishop’s Palace.

May 20, 2019

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The palace has been extensively modified and added to over the course of 800 years, and is reflective of many architectural styles.
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Some parts of the palace are ruins or have been adapted, like this wall which now forms part of the enclosure for a large lawn space.

The grounds were fairly extensive, with opportunities to see many stages of development and abandonment. They also serve as space for art – both secular and religious – and even political expression.

Stature of a person in a tunic.
There were nice art installations – some religious, some secular – throughout the grounds.
Colored glass sculpture shaped like bird wings.
Stained glass wing sculpture (there were a couple of them).
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MCU Falcon character reboot?

Many of the ruins on the palace grounds are at least somewhat intentional. As parts fell into disrepair, the structures were modified to be “more picturesque” as successive bishops and architects sought to mold the expansive ruin to their own ideals.

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The formal gardens and landscaping are indeed beautiful, and the views of the Cathedral itself are as worthy as any artistic masterpiece, in my opinion.

Stained glass arch window with topiaries in the foreground.
Looking in on the Bishop’s Chapel
A pond with evergreen and deciduous vegetation behind and water plants in the foreground.
Springs and gardens on the palace grounds.
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As optimally designed, this church would have a tall spire atop the central tower. Weather and fire have made all but a few lost over time.
Cathedral tower rising with the church in front of trimmed hedges and trees.
Another magnificent view of the cathedral from the formal gardens.

Similar to the city of Bath, Wells gets its name from the abundance of accessible groundwater and natural springs, many of which were harnessed or enhanced on the palace grounds.

Water feature with small waterfall flowing away and down into the gardens.
The small waterfall drops water down into a system of channels.
Channelized flow between manicured lawns.
Another formal water feature based on the natural upwellings.

The interior of the palace, including the chapel, is a progression and mixing of the various historical periods, spanning from the 13th century to modern day. In the essence of saving time, here’s a slide show of the interior shots.

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Some interior shots of the Bishop’s Palace. Most of it is a museum and public space now, but the nearby Bishop’s House is still used as a residence and church office.

Both the church and the palace were immense and impressive, and it’s hard to portray the grandeur from these photos. With any impressive space, be it natural or human, it’s best to experience it in person. Hopefully that’s something that you can do one day, if it is in your means.

Ancient stone gatehouse with two turrets over a pointed arch entrance.
Farewell, Wells!

But our day was not over yet. We had some time to make an almost too-quick run to Cheddar, where we did buy and eat some “genuine” Cheddar Cheese, and make a brief drive up the gorge. Cheddar is a quaint village, and if we ever do return to the UK, I’d like to spend a little more time there.

Old stone storefront and wall.
The village has many quaint shops and picturesque views.

The waters that carved the gorge and associated caves is the Cheddar Yeo, and it emerges above ground in the village. It’s been a traditional source of power for centuries.

Shallow stream running toward the foreground alongside a stone wall.
The Cheddar Yeo, emerging in the village of Cheddar. Part of an “Excalibur” sword, for tourists has surely rusted in place by now.
stone walls topped with herbaceous plants lead into a village.
A pretty view of the village and the animal sculptures in the channelized water feature.

We did some window shopping and I bought some local fudge before we headed back to Bristol for the evening, having had another full and satisfying day out with friends.

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